Category Archives: Web development

Webmonkey.com Returns

When I was first learning web development about ten years ago, I frequently consulted Webmonkey.com for tutorials about how to do all things “DHTML.” I still remember how an article comparing frames to a cafeteria tray made it all click for me, for some reason. I also picked up some bad habits that I had [...]

A Good Enough addEvent

Several years ago, PPK of Quirksmode sponsored a contest to come up with a new version of the trusty JavaScript addEvent function. The original addEvent was created by Scott Andrew LePera in 2001 as a way to merge Internet Explorer’s attachEvent with the W3C’s addEventListener. Both addEventListener and attachEvent allow you to attach a JavaScript [...]

CSS Naked Day

If you think things look odd here today, it’s because I’ve disabled my blog’s styling for “CSS Naked Day.” The idea is to emphasize that styling on the web–particularly, that done with CSS, or “cascading style sheets”–should be separate from the structure, or markup. In part, one should separate style from content because a number [...]

Internet Explorer 7 Float Bug

Today while developing a WordPress theme for a client, I ran into a vexing Internet Explorer 7 bug. Anyone who’s done any website design is familiar with Internet Explorer 6 (or earlier) wreaking havoc with standards-compliant work that looks good in, say, Firefox. But thankfully IE 7 has for the most part been a big [...]

Comcast.com: A Good Example of Bad Web Design

That’s what I saw when I went to pay my bill at Comcast.com, something I’ve done several times before. I do have Flash—it just happens to be Flash 7, the highest version Adobe has yet released for Linux. The problem with making your website depend on proprietary technology, such as a particular version of Flash, [...]

TurboDBAdmin

I don’t necessary start salivating just because someone says “Ajax,” but I’ve installed a handy database tool featured on digg.com called TurboDbAdmin. True, it doesn’t have the features of PHPMyAdmin, but for manipulating data, it’s much more convenient.